Fun Wedding Facts

Some curious wedding facts from around the world

  • The largest wedding attendance was a Jewish wedding in Jerusalem in 1993 where 30,000 people attended.
  • The most expensive wedding was the one held in a purpose-built stadium in Dubai for a Shiek's son. The wedding cost over £22 million.
  • The longest wedding dress train was found in Germany, it measured over 515 feet.
  • Tuck a sugar cube into your glove -- according to Greek culture, the sugar will sweeten your union.
  • Rain on your wedding day is actually considered good luck, according to Hindu tradition!
  • For good luck, Egyptian women pinch the bride on her wedding day. Ouch!
  • Peas are thrown at Czech newlyweds instead of rice.
  • A Swedish bride puts a silver coin from her father and a gold coin from her mother in each shoe to ensure that she'll never do without.
  • A Finnish bride traditionally went door-to-door collecting gifts in a pillowcase, accompanied by an older married man who represented long marriage.
  • Moroccan women take a milk bath to purify themselves before their wedding ceremony.
  • In Holland, a pine tree can be planted outside the newlyweds' home as a symbol of fertility and luck.
  • Engagement and wedding rings are worn on the fourth finger of the left hand because it was once thought that a vein in that finger led directly to the heart.
  • Diamonds set in gold or silver became popular as betrothal rings among wealthy Venetians toward the end of the fifteenth century.
  • Snake rings dotted with ruby eyes were popular wedding bands in Victorian England - the coils winding into a circle symbolized eternity.
  • Queen Victoria started the Western world's white wedding dress trend in 1840 - before then, brides simply wore their best dress.
  • In Japan, white was always the color of choice for bridal ensembles -long before Queen Victoria popularized it in the Western world.
  • In Asia, wearing robes with embroidered cranes symbolizes fidelity for the length of a marriage.
  • In Korea, brides don bright hues of red and yellow to take their vows.
  • Ancient Greeks and Romans thought the veil protected the bride from evil spirits. Brides have worn veils ever since.
  • The "something blue" in a bridal ensemble symbolizes purity, fidelity, and love.
  • The tradition of a wedding cake comes from ancient Rome, where revelers broke a loaf of bread over a bride's head for fertility's sake.
  • The custom of tiered cakes emerged from a game where the bride and groom attempted to kiss over an ever-higher cake without knocking it over.
  • Queen Victoria's wedding cake weighed a whopping 300 pounds.
  • Stag parties were first held by ancient Spartan soldiers, who kissed their bachelor days goodbye with a raucous party.